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Leave It To Me!

Description

The plot of LEAVE IT TO ME! follows the antics of a reluctant American ambassador to Stalinist Russia just before the beginning of World War II. The show features such memorable Cole Porter numbers as “Get Out Of Town” and “My Heart Belongs To Daddy.”

Synopsis

Bathtub manufacturer Alonzo P. Goodhue, socially and politically the best horseshoe pitcher in Topeka, Kansas, is appointed U.S. Ambassador to Russia, largely through the manueverings of his ambitious wife. An envious J. H. Brody, publisher of the Paris and Chicago World-Tribune, orders his best correspondent, Buckley Thomas, to see that Goodhue is disgraced and recalled. As it turns out, the unassuming Goodhue is himself anxious to be shipped home, and so he and Thomas join forces. Goodhue delivers an antagonistic speech, kicks the German Ambassador in the belly, and atttempts to assassinate a Prince — and in each case he is proclaimed a hero. Finally, Thomas, realizing that only good deeds go unrewarded, has Goodhue deliver an optimistic speech expressing hope for a unified world. Goodhue is promptly recalled. Other characters include Colette, Thomas’ old flame, and Dolly, an incorrigible flirt.

Credits

LEAVE IT TO ME
Book by Bella and Sam Spewack
Music and Lyrics by Cole Porter

Such credits to the authors for all purposes shall be in type size equal to or greater than that of any other credits except for that of the star(s) above the title. In the programs, the credits shall appear on the title page thereof.

The title page of the program shall contain the following announcement in type size at least one-half the size of the authors’ credits:

LEAVE IT TO ME
is presented by arrangement with
TAMS-WITMARK MUSIC LIBRARY, INC.
560 Lexington Avenue, New York, New York 10022

Rehearsal Materials

1       Piano Conductor’s Score
1       Prompt Book

Cast List

First Secretary, a young girl
Second Secretary, a young girl
Buckley Joyce Thomas, a fast-talking newspaperman
First Reporter, a young man
Second Reporter, a young man
Dolly Winslow, a young attractive night club singer
J. H. Brody, a tall, middle-aged distinguished poop
Jerry Grainger, a young diplomat
Prince Alexander Tomofsky, a middle-aged man; should be Russian, must be able to speak English
French Conductor, a middle-aged man with accent
Mrs. Goodhue, a middle-aged woman
Mrs. Goodhue’s Daughters, five young girls, scaling in ages from 16 years, and must be specialty dancers
Reporter, a young man
Photographer, a middle-aged man
Chauffeur, a young American chauffeur
Alonzo P. Goodhue, a short middle-aged man
Secretaries to Mr. Goodhue, all young men and must be specialty dancers
Colette, a young and pretty newspaper woman
Kostya, a Russian interpreter and must be able to speak Russian and good English
Military Attache, a young man
Naval Attache, a young man
Secretaries, two young men
Decorators, two young men
Peasant, a heavy set middle-aged Russian and must be able to speak English
Sosanoff, a worker, a Russian Communistic type, and must be able to speak good English
Waiters, two young men
German Ambassador, a large, heavy-set man with German accent
French Ambassador, a distinguished looking man about fory-five, wearing a Van dyke, and with accent
Litvian Minister, a large heavy-set man, middle-aged and with accent
Italian Ambassador, a rather distinguished looking man of thirty-five and with accent
British Ambassador, an elderly looking Englishman
Mackenzie, a young looking Englishman
Graustein, a middle-aged Russian with accent and must be able to speak good English
Folkin, another Russian about the same as Graustein. Doesn’t have to speak lines
Secretary to Foreign Minister, a young man, no speaking lines
Foreign Minister, a tall, very distinguished middle-aged Russian and must be able to speak good English
Stalin, to be made up as an exact replica
Yogi Ambassador

Brief History

LEAVE IT TO ME! opened on Broadway at the Imperial Theatre, November 9, 1938. It played for 291 performances starring William Gaxton, Victor Moore, Sophie Tucker and, in her Broadway debut, Mary Martin.